1. Generate Key Pem Cert Pem Form
  2. Generate Key Pem File
  3. Generate Private Key From Pem
  1. Read instructions on how to create different.pem files for three different scenarios. Learn more about the installation process here. Creating a.pem File for SSL Certificate Installations.
  2. In case you need more objects (e.g. Key and cert) you need PEM encoded form where based on the 'header' is possible to differentiate the objects (in the file the objects follow each other) or some specific container format like PKCS12 (also supported by openssl).
  3. To generate a self-signed SSL certificate using the OpenSSL, complete the following steps: Write down the Common Name (CN) for your SSL Certificate. The CN is the fully qualified name for the system that uses the certificate.

Finally, we’ve the Private Key, the Certificate issued, the Intermediate Certificate and the Root CA Certificate. All these file contents should be combined to create the PEM file in UNIX format. GENERATE CERTIFICATE IN PEM FORMAT. The PEM certificate must to be built with the following structure.

6.3.7 Creating SSL Certificates and Keys Using openssl

This section describes how to use the openssl command to set up SSL certificate and key files for use by MySQL servers and clients. The first example shows a simplified procedure such as you might use from the command line. The second shows a script that contains more detail. The first two examples are intended for use on Unix and both use the openssl command that is part of OpenSSL. The third example describes how to set up SSL files on Windows.

Whatever method you use to generate the certificate and key files, the Common Name value used for the server and client certificates/keys must each differ from the Common Name value used for the CA certificate. Otherwise, the certificate and key files will not work for servers compiled using OpenSSL. A typical error in this case is:

Example 1: Creating SSL Files from the Command Line on Unix

The following example shows a set of commands to create MySQL server and client certificate and key files. You will need to respond to several prompts by the openssl commands. To generate test files, you can press Enter to all prompts. To generate files for production use, you should provide nonempty responses.

After generating the certificates, verify them:

Generate Key Pem Cert Pem Form

Pem

Now you have a set of files that can be used as follows:

  • ca.pem: Use this as the argument to --ssl-ca on the server and client sides. (The CA certificate, if used, must be the same on both sides.)

  • server-cert.pem, server-key.pem: Use these as the arguments to --ssl-cert and --ssl-key on the server side.

  • client-cert.pem, client-key.pem: Use these as the arguments to --ssl-cert and --ssl-key on the client side.

To use the files for SSL connections, see Section 6.3.6.4, “Configuring MySQL to Use Secure Connections”.

Example 2: Creating SSL Files Using a Script on Unix

Here is an example script that shows how to set up SSL certificate and key files for MySQL. After executing the script, use the files for SSL connections as described in Section 6.3.6.4, “Configuring MySQL to Use Secure Connections”.

Example 3: Creating SSL Files on Windows

Generate Key Pem File

Download OpenSSL for Windows if it is not installed on your system. An overview of available packages can be seen here:

Choose the Win32 OpenSSL Light or Win64 OpenSSL Light package, depending on your architecture (32-bit or 64-bit). The default installation location will be C:OpenSSL-Win32 or C:OpenSSL-Win64, depending on which package you downloaded. The following instructions assume a default location of C:OpenSSL-Win32. Modify this as necessary if you are using the 64-bit package.

If a message occurs during setup indicating '...critical component is missing: Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 Redistributables', cancel the setup and download one of the following packages as well, again depending on your architecture (32-bit or 64-bit):

  • Visual C++ 2008 Redistributables (x86), available at:

  • Visual C++ 2008 Redistributables (x64), available at:

After installing the additional package, restart the OpenSSL setup procedure.

During installation, leave the default C:OpenSSL-Win32 as the install path, and also leave the default option 'Copy OpenSSL DLL files to the Windows system directory' selected.

When the installation has finished, add C:OpenSSL-Win32bin to the Windows System Path variable of your server:

  1. On the Windows desktop, right-click the My Computer icon, and select Properties.

  2. Select the Advanced tab from the System Properties menu that appears, and click the button.

  3. Under System Variables, select Path, then click the button. The Edit System Variable dialogue should appear.

  4. Add ';C:OpenSSL-Win32bin' to the end (notice the semicolon).

  5. Press OK 3 times.

  6. Check that OpenSSL was correctly integrated into the Path variable by opening a new command console (Start>Run>cmd.exe) and verifying that OpenSSL is available:

Depending on your version of Windows, the preceding path-setting instructions might differ slightly.

After OpenSSL has been installed, use instructions similar to those from from Example 1 (shown earlier in this section), with the following changes:

  • Change the following Unix commands:

    On Windows, use these commands instead:

  • When a ' character is shown at the end of a command line, this ' character must be removed and the command lines entered all on a single line.

After generating the certificate and key files, to use them for SSL connections, see Section 6.3.6.4, “Configuring MySQL to Use Secure Connections”.

.pem SSL Creation Instructions

SSL .pem files (concatenated certificate container files), are frequently required for certificate installations when multiple certificates are being imported as one file.

This article contains multiple sets of instructions that walk through various .pem file creation scenarios.

Creating a .pem with the Entire SSL Certificate Trust Chain

  1. Log into your DigiCert Management Console and download your Intermediate (DigiCertCA.crt), Root (TrustedRoot.crt), and Primary Certificates (your_domain_name.crt).
  2. Open a text editor (such as wordpad) and paste the entire body of each certificate into one text file in the following order:

    1. The Primary Certificate - your_domain_name.crt
    2. The Intermediate Certificate - DigiCertCA.crt
    3. The Root Certificate - TrustedRoot.crt

    Make sure to include the beginning and end tags on each certificate. The result should look like this:

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Primary SSL certificate: your_domain_name.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Intermediate certificate: DigiCertCA.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Root certificate: TrustedRoot.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    Save the combined file as your_domain_name.pem. The .pem file is now ready to use.

Creating a .pem with the Server and Intermediate Certificates

  1. Log into your DigiCert Management Console and download your Intermediate (DigiCertCA.crt) and Primary Certificates (your_domain_name.crt).
  2. Open a text editor (such as wordpad) and paste the entire body of each certificate into one text file in the following order:

    1. The Primary Certificate - your_domain_name.crt
    2. The Intermediate Certificate - DigiCertCA.crt

    Make sure to include the beginning and end tags on each certificate. The result should look like this:

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Primary SSL certificate: your_domain_name.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Intermediate certificate: DigiCertCA.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    Save the combined file as your_domain_name.pem. The .pem file is now ready to use.

Generate Private Key From Pem

Creating a .pem with the Private Key and Entire Trust Chain

  1. Log into your DigiCert Management Console and download your Intermediate (DigiCertCA.crt) and Primary Certificates (your_domain_name.crt).
  2. Open a text editor (such as wordpad) and paste the entire body of each certificate into one text file in the following order:

    1. The Private Key - your_domain_name.key
    2. The Primary Certificate - your_domain_name.crt
    3. The Intermediate Certificate - DigiCertCA.crt
    4. The Root Certificate - TrustedRoot.crt

    Make sure to include the beginning and end tags on each certificate. The result should look like this:

    -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    (Your Private Key: your_domain_name.key)
    -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Primary SSL certificate: your_domain_name.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Intermediate certificate: DigiCertCA.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    -----BEGIN CERTIFICATE-----
    (Your Root certificate: TrustedRoot.crt)
    -----END CERTIFICATE-----

    Save the combined file as your_domain_name.pem. The .pem file is now ready to use.

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